11/19/10

Update: Magnet Set Minifigs May Not Come Off

I don't want to jump the gun, but I have some news about both the latest LEGO Pharaoh's Quest magnet set and, potentially, future magnet sets.

I just opened magnet set #853168 and the minfigures are glued to the bases. Not only that, the torsos are glued to the legs! The only parts that will come off are the heads, hair, hats, and accessories. Darren, a reader, had asked me about this earlier, but I dismissed it as previous magnet sets were not set up this way. It sounds like Darren was right.

I then called the US LEGO Customer Service line. They said this was the first instance they had heard about this for the Pharaoh's Quest line; however, there were rumors of considering this for future licensed sets.

So although this is coming from LEGO Customer Service, I'm considering this a 'rumor' until we know for certain. The associate I talked to stated there was talk of the 2011 licensed magnet sets not allowing you to remove the minifigs. Are licensing partners upset that people were buying magnet sets over play sets? Who knows, but this is important news to consider when buying these products in the future.

If official word is released regarding this development, I will let you know. In the meantime, I'll be taking my magnet sets back to the store after the weekend.

11 comments:

  1. This is pretty crazy. Everyone I know buys magnets for the minifigs and I'm certain LEGO knows this. I think that LEGO is better of selling little minifig packs.

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  2. Wow can't believe LEGO would do that. >:I

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  3. 2009/2010 Star Wars Magnet sets caused 4th quarter profits for the Lego group to plunge considerably. The group can't sell a set at retail. Specifically Dooku's Solar Sail, AAT, and Republic Shuttle have collected dust on retail shelves the last several months when they would have otherwise been sold fairly fast. Its my opinion that the group will no longer be able to afford such a loss.

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  4. I was informed it a more of contract issue between Disney, LucasArts and LEGO. And LEGO caved in to appease them!

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  5. But, if it's the licensed magnets that are to be glued then how come that these are too? AFAIK Pharaos Quest isn't a license.

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  6. Sales for Legos will go DOWN. Are that that stupid? Why not put new figures in the magnet sets that aren't in building sets? Sales would go up, up, and up.

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  7. Patrick Bégin, a LEGO Ambassador representing QuéLUG, got official word from LEGO on this subject :

    "All Extended Line minifigure magnet sets will as of Jan 1st 2011 be glued.

    Based on new requirements, the magnet base and the minifigures will have to be permanently fixed together on LEGO Star Wars magnet sets.

    To ensure a consistent consumer experience across all LEGO minifigure magnet sets we have chosen to permanently fix the minifigure to the magnet base on all magnet sets moving forward from Jan 1st 2011 (incl. Pharaoh’s Quest launching Dec 1st). This decision has been carefully considered and was not taken easily as we know that many consumers will obviously not like this change."

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  8. Actually sales for lego will go up. The magnet sets caused larger sets to not be bought since the minifigures could be obtained much more easily via magnets. While putting up new figures in magnet sets that aren't in building sets; it may not be a cost effective idea. This would require Lego to invest in new print runs, new part molds, etc. Which would in a sense bring a price raise. On the other hand; by using figures that were already in sets, they don't have to pay for molds; print runs, etc. Lego Magnet sets were originally intended to be used as a magnet; not a figure. Which is why they show up in accessories and not minifigures. They most likely changed to the figure + magnet brick to save on costs.
    It is disappointing; but that's business...

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  9. as posted elsewhere it's all about licensing, and selling licensed minifigs separately (or in un-glued magnet sets) infringes on the action figure licenses sold to other companies (as opposed to the building block license Lego has). Lego basically needs to re-evaluate their strategy, scrap the magnets, and concentrate on the battle pack sets for the same effect. I for one will not be buying anything glued, and would discourage anyone else from supporting this either.

    That being said, if Lego wants to increase sales of larger sets they simply need to increase the minifig to cost ratio (and specifically previously unreleased minifigs). If I’m laying down $100 I want at least 6 to 8 new minifigs. This and this alone is why I have not been buying the larger sets.

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  10. It's a shame but ultimately they were pricing themselves off the shelf. I for one never bought the magnet sets as I thought the figs would be glued (but not to the magnet) and have been buying loads of the magnets on bricklink to display my figs, got half the wall done. Will be buying more magnets soon

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  11. We melted the adhesive off by soaking the magnet figurines in 160-degree water for about 5 minutes and then gingerly working them apart. We did this so my 4yo son could play with them, so keep in mind they do show a little bit of wear / adhesive scarring where the magnet was separated from the back of the legs. Note: we were unable to get the legs / hands apart from the torso this way - my son was disappointed at first, but he'll get over it!! ;-) You should be able to find more info on the internet about this process.

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